Not Quoting to Specification can end up costing you more…

Not Quoting to Specification can end up costing you more…

Not Quoting to Specification can end up costing you more…

January 9 2014

With upcoming projects in 2016 occasionally sub-contractors will try to substitute a product for a cheaper alternative to cut down on costs. Sometimes this can work as the product differences are merely cosmetic or are considered “deemed to comply”.

However sometimes the difference is significant and can lead to several problems for the Subbie and Builder.  This “alternative solution” could occur on projects that are required to meet a Fire Rating or aiming to achieve a Green Star rating, and that’s when the project can become costly.

This lack of attention to the specification can make it appear ok to change the product for a cheaper alternative. Little do they know that in time it will cost them significantly, with the Specifier choosing to over-ride the decision and enforce the original product to be used, hopefully before the “cheaper” product has been installed, so as to avoid a tear down and reinstall situation.  A large monetary loss is on the horizon for any project looking to use an “alternative product”

Here are some tips to ensuring you are getting the most out of your project:

  • Architects work with your manufacturer to write the correct specification – most companies are happy to write it for you.
  • Price the project based on the specification provided in tender – generally most architects have navigated which product is best and wish for that to be used
  • Read closely the products requirements as each specification needs to meet a building code
  • Don’t substitute unless agreed upon by specifier and architects

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